Calming Your Dog During Fireworks Season

June 29th, 2017 by Marlene Ring

Fear of fireworks is a fairly common phobia for dogs.

The noise, smell of sulfur and flashing lights can be quite upsetting. Fortunately there are several things you can do to keep your pet safe and cared for during the celebration.

 

Prepare your House

Shut all the doors and windows and draw curtains to block flashes and reduce noise levels.

Keep the lights on to calm your pet and make him feel more secure, rather than being scared in a dark room.

 

Drown the Noise Out

Dog with RadioPlay music or turn on something that emits white noise.

Vacuum, wash clothes, turn on a fan or the television.

Anything you can do to minimize or cover the sounds from outside.

 

Create a ‘Safe Place’

Hiding dogChoose an inner room that is least impacted by the outside noise.

Make the room cozy and put down familiar bedding somewhere pleasant such as under a table or behind a chair.

 

Dog-chewing-toyAllow the dog to hide when they are scared and give them a Special treat like a meaty bone or a special chew toy.

Provide a Treat Toy that holds delectable nibbles – anything to divert your dog’s attention from the noise.

 

Prepare

Keep a Microchipcollar on your dog just in case he accidentally escapes.

Make sure your dog is microchipped too.

That way if he does escape without a collar this will insure you are reunited as quickly as possible.

 

Exercise! post3Make sure your dog gets plenty of exercise earlier in the day.

Place them in their ‘Safe Place’ half an hour to an hour before the fireworks are due to be set off.

 

Try using lavender scented items to calm your dog before the event begins.

 

ThundershirtPurchase a “Thunder Shirt” ahead of time.

These garments apply gentle, constant pressure that has a dramatic calming effect.

Click HERE for more info.

 

Stay Calm

Woman-relaxing-with-dogTry to act and behave as normally as possible since your dog will pick up on any odd behavior.

Remain calm, happy and cheerful as this will send positive signals to your dog.

 

Finally, for extreme cases of phobia, contact your vet to discuss a prescription medication.

 

July 4th dogDid you know that more dogs are lost during the 4th of July Holiday than any other time of the year?

Don’t let this happen to you!

Prepare ahead of time so you and your dog can have a safe and peaceful celebration.

Start building a better communication and relationship with your dog!